What's New

Student organizers from BIPOC communities are often the heartbeat of social movements that lead to transformative justice, the development of spaces that celebrate marginalized communities, push institutions to change policies supporting institutional racism, or dismantle other discriminatory practices that are abusive toward BIPOC students. Activists from marginalized student communities were integral to the protests of 2020’s racial reckoning in the aftermath of the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbury. Student organizers hold institutions and communities accountable demanding redress against the long history of white supremacy, to shifting funds away from campus police, to repatriating stolen artifacts to their rightful homes. We want to help give these agents of change their flowers, past and present! Read more here:

Featured Collection:

Iowa State University Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) presents “A Home Away From Home: The George A. Jackson Black Cultural Center” an exhibition to recognize the 2020 50th Anniversary of the George A. Jackson Black Cultural Center. Featuring correspondence, photos, event programs, and newsletters from University Archives collections, exhibition materials show the work of the ISU’s Black Student Organization (BSO) to gain recognition and establish the George A. Jackson Black Cultural Center.

 

Announcing Project STAND AND AUC Robert Woodruff Library Receives $750,000 Mellon Grant

ATLANTA, Georgia, February 22, 2021 – The Atlanta University Center (AUC) Robert W. Woodruff Library in partnership with Project STAND has received generous funding of $750,000 from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support a three-year project: Building Capacity, Ethical Documentation and Archiving of Student Activism in BIPOC Communities. The project will advance the community archiving of social justice initiatives among former and current college and university students of color. The AUC Woodruff Library and Project STAND will collaborate with the University of Maryland Libraries (College Park), and the 65 Project STAND consortium member institutions to support the archiving and accessibility of documentation of organizing and activism among Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) students. (More)

Collections

“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.”

James Baldwin

Student activism has and continues to serve as a critical component to the development of a truly democratic society. The collections featured here are from various colleges and universities and they highlight the struggles, victories, and challenges of student movements throughout history.

Connect with these participating institutions to learn more.

About

What is Project STAND?

Project STAND is a radical grassroots archival consortia project between colleges and universities around the country; to create a centralized digital space highlighting analog and digital collections emphasizing student activism in marginalized communities.

More information about participating institutions can be found here.

 

History

In the fall of 2016, Project STAND (Student Activism Now Documented) was established to initially bring together academic institutions across the state of Ohio and discuss ways to share information about the collections and materials related to student activism on their campuses, with a primary focus on marginalized student identities (African American, LGBTQ, Chicano/a, differently abled, Asian Americans, indigenous populations etc.)

This exciting initiative was initially conceived by Lae’l Hughes-Watkins, University Archivist at Kent State University who reached out to Tamar Chute, University Archivist at The Ohio State University, on the possibility of creating a centralized hub for academic archives focusing on underrepresented communities’ engagement in social justice activities on and off campus.